Friday, February 18, 2005

Leon: The Professional and Mathilda: The Amateur

Today I watched the film, Leon: The Professional. It's one of my absolute favorite films, and a film that really gets to me emotionally like few others do. I'm taking a course on action cinema right now, and I can think of few examples of the straight up action movie done better than this film. Why does Leon work where so many other action films fail?

The primary reason is because rather than being built around arbitrarily imposed action set pieces, the story development comes from the characters. There's not actually that much action in the film, there's the scene at the beginning, the finale and the montage of Leon and Mathilda 'cleaning' in the middle, but if you compare it to most action films, you'll find that not too much of the screentime is spent on action.

What it is spent on is character development, and this film has two of the richest characters ever seen on screen, the odd couple that the film is centered around, Leon and Mathilda. Right from the beginning of the film, you can empathize with these characters. A large part of that is due to the acting. Natalie Portman, who has been brilliant in some recent films, hasn't ever touched this performance, which is so natural and perfect, the line between character and actor is completely obliterated, you can't even imagine that this isn't a real person walking around. The first time I saw Mathilda, I thought wow, that looks like a miniature version of her now, but once she starts acting, you forget that this is Natalie Portman of Star Wars, it becomes Mathilda, hitgirl.

On a similar note, I don't know what Jean Reno is like in real life, but I couldn't imagine him being any different from Leon. He completely inhabits the role, and brings such an innocence to it, that you can't help but feel for the character. It's paradoxical because he is someone who kills for a living, but Reno makes you understand the humanity of the character from the very first scene. The movie theater scene sets out a lot of what's to come, as you watch this guy we previously knew only as a hardened killer get completely entranced by Gene Kelly dancing on the screen.

While they're both great characters on their own, it's in their relationship with each other that they become truly special. The scene where Mathilda is standing at the door, knocking, begging Leon to let her in always gets to me, to the point where I want to yell at Leon to open the door. The scene turns any viewer into stereotypical black female moviegoer, yelling at the characters on the screen, and that's because it's so well made. The stakes of the scene are clear, Leon has a very particular existence, one that he would forever destroy should he let Mathilda in, and yet, he also knows that to not let her would mean she would die. His humanity prevails, and thus begins the gradual humanization of the killer, Leon. Mathilda begging him at the door is such a powerful image, and a brilliant piece of acting from Natalie Portman. Similarly, Reno's very subtle facial expressions convey to us everything that's going through his head.

Another scene I have to make note of is the pig scene, where Leon puts on a show with his oven mitt for Mathilda. He's so goofy, and sincere in his hope to make her feel better.

Basically any scene between the two of them is brilliant. The two characters are perfectly designed counterparts. Leon is old, but child like, while Mathilda is young, yet much more knowledgeable about the world. They form a perfect match, and just watching the two of them interact is riveting.

The ambiguity of the relationship is what provides most of the tension in the second half. Once Mathilda tells Leon she loves him, he clearly begins to question what exactly their relationship is, and how far he can go with her. He wants to distance himself, but though he can't admit it until the end, he loves her too. The question one could ponder forever is, does that love go beyond concern and into the romantic arena? I would say no, I think Leon's moral code is so strict, and he so naive, that he would never even see her in a sexual way, and that's why her assertion that she loves him is so disconcerting. He had never considered that element of their relationship, and it makes relations more strained between the two of them in the second half.

One really frustrating scene for me, another 'stereotypical black female moviegoer' moment is when Mathilda tells the hotel clerk that Leon is her lover. How could she do that to Leon? It frustrates me so much, because I don't want to see him put in that situation.

Just the fact that the movie can get me so worked up makes me know it's a great film. A lot of directors will create these arbitrary attempts to bring tension to events, but Besson knows that it's better to just let it develop out of character interactions. There's no artificially imposed problems that create action scenes, everything comes out of the actions of Mathilda and Leon.

The scene in which Mathilda and Leon sleep together (but not in that way) is really beautiful. It says so much about how he's changed that he allows himself the comfort to let down his guard and just be happy for once. It's probably the first time he let himself do that since his girlfriend back home died. What Mathilda does for Leon is reintroduce him to the human world. It's almost like a Tim Burton movie, where this outsider who can't find his way into the world gets assisted into it by a kindly person. Leon is ultimately humanized, and at the end, he chooses Mathilda's safety over his own, and thus, we see how his priorities have changed over the course of the film. At the beginning, he was contemplating killing Mathilda himself, but now at the end, he places her life way above his. If he can get her out, he's happy, and in the end, despite the fact that he's dying, he's glad because he has given Mathilda what she wanted, her revenge.

But, he also gave her more than that. Much like Mathilda helps Leon overcome a personal tragedy, he does the same for her. His simple kindness and giving is what allows her to move on from her bad past, and at the end of the film, make a new start for herself. Leon was more of a father to her in the four weeks they spent together than her real father was in the twelve years they spent together.

I really like the ending of the film. While I'd have loved to have seen the Mathilda/Leon partnership continue, it's more logical for her to return to society, but still hold onto the lessons she learned over the course of the film. When she speaks to the woman running the school, she uses the same language she used when first approaching Leon, and the chance is there for a similar relationship. And, of course, the final image says so much. Mathilda is giving Leon his roots, just as she may have finally found a place that she can call home.

The film has many of the qualities of a typical early-mid 90s action movie, such as Besson's own La Femme Nikita, but it becomes special in the characters. Besson has made a number of other films, and the ones I've seen haven't even touched Leon. It's a confluence of a great script and direction and brilliant acting. If Natalie Portman hadn't been as good, the film would not have worked, and it took Jean Reno's innocence to make the relationship as interesting as it was. You never once think that he'd try to take advantage of her, and that's essential.

I love the film because of the people in it. Much like Before Sunrise or In the Mood For Love, the tension comes not out of action situations or plot points, but out of minute interactions between two characters. You can feel exactly what they feel, and want nothing more than for them to be happy. I love to really feel when I'm watching a film, and Leon makes me feel.

On a side note, rumors have been circulating for a while about a Mathilda sequel film. On the one hand, I don't think it could possibly be as good as Leon, but I'd love to see it. As I've probably made clear, Natalie Portman is brilliant as Mathilda, and I'd love to see how she approaches the character now, after so many years of acting. There's plenty to be explored around the character, and Before Sunset and 2046 have shown me that a great sequel can enhance the film it came from. The thing I wouldn't want to see would be Mathilda training a new apprentice, I'd rather see a new plot, same character. But, even if it's not good, I'll still be there opening day, Besson earned that with the brilliant film he created.

Related Posts
My Favorite Actresses (1/17/2005)

51 comments:

jolinn said...

pity this is such an old post. But you did a great job analyzing the structure of a really great movie. Too bad Leon dies, but it had to happen. *sigh*

Anonymous said...

'Leon' trully is a great film, I very much loved all the characters involved, I was so surprised to see myself getting into the story so much. I felt saddness when Leon died and when Mathilda sufferred saddness after discovering this tragedy, the way the film captivates it's audience so well is amazing. This is a great a film with great characters and a great story. I just wish I had more thumbs to give it more than two thumbs up!

Anonymous said...

Apparently you haven't read the version one script where Leon and Mathilda do "sleep" with each other in that way, parents of Portman didn't feel comfortable with the scenes so they were removed. Luc published a book then about the history of the film, in French that included the original script.

Anonymous said...

Good analysis mate!

Anonymous said...

Notice Leon says he is like his plant because he has no roots, meaning he is always traveling and never settling down because he is a hit-man. But in the end when Mathilda plants Leon's plant in the ground to grow roots, Leon will get "roots". He has finally settled down to Mathilda's mind, living in her memories forever (the best place he could have settled down). The director did a good job adding this into the film.

Anonymous said...

I would have loved to see the alternate, original, ending shot. In it, when Leon is shot at the end, Matilda comes in guns blazing to be at Leon's side as he dies. She leans down to kiss Leon, and hands stansfield the grenade pin. She opens her jacket (full of nades) and the explosion happens. This would have been so much more profound than the "plant" ending because it would have given the film closure and a feeling of finality, instead of its open endedness.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0110413/board/nest/119643762

Anonymous said...

visit:

mathildalando.com

fan site devoted to best movie.

Amanda said...

You posted this like 5 years ago, so there's a good chance you may never read this, but on the off-chance that you do, I had to tell you that I loved your blog on The Professional. I just discovered the movie recently and I'm in love with it and have been going nuts trying to find more about it/on it like behind the scenes books and whatnot and have come up short.

I completely agree with your interpretation of the characters. There's really only one thing that makes me question Leon's true concern for Mathilda. He unquestionably loves her, but his decision to initiate her into the world of murder IS questionable. He admits that taking lives has ruined his own, so why would he wish that upon her? He loves her more than his own life, but considering that, why would he show her down the path that would lead her to living as he does?

Also, regarding Mathilda being "in love" with Leon, she isn't the best judge of her own feelings. As a 12 year old girl who (I assume) has never had a nurturing or loving male figure in her life, it's easy to confuse feelings for such a male with those of romance or lust. It's textbook psychology. And Portman's flawless portrayal of such a precocious and street-smart kid makes it very easy to forget that she is so young, so I think it's fair to say that Leon, at the very least, considered her, fleetingly, in a romantic light. If he hadn't, he wouldn't have shared with her the story of his girlfriend, and he especially wouldn't have said "I wouldn't make a good lover."

But you're right in that he never would have taken advantage of her.

Anyways, I don't want to go on and on, even though I'd like to, but I loved your blog and if you ever read this and want to talk about it some more my email is concreteayngel@aim.com.

Amanda

Patrick said...

I'm still reading these comments, even five years later!

The question of why Leon inducts Mathilda into the world of killing is something that's not really addressed in the film. I think it's because he's such a damaged person, he doesn't understand any other way to live. It's also the thing he's best at, so when Mathilda asks him to train her, he can use his expertise and express his caring in a way that works for him. He can't take care of her or give her anything else, or at least that's what he thinks.

Anonymous said...

I wasn't going to leave a comment until I saw that you are, in fact, still checking these 5 years later! (kudos to you for that!) Anyway, to parrot what everyone else has been saying, I completely agree with everything in your post and I feel like we have the same reactions throughout the movie (esp. the 'black female' moments). :) Also, I would like to comment on what 'Amanda' had said about a couple of different things:

First, in regards to why Leon would mix Mathilda up in the world of murder, when he first agrees to this it is a) out of extreme reluctancy--she has to empty a gun onto the street below from his window to let him know she's serious, but then she shows him her maturity in their new apartment when she asks to learn "the theory"--and b) before he has begun to love her, right now she's just an (extremely mature) little girl whose just lost her family in a very f***ed up way. Also, just in case your still in doubt, think of his last words to Mathilda: they are not words of murder or revenge, but a message of regret--regret of the life he has led, an empty life without roots or even the comforts of feeling like a human being. He DOES NOT want this for her and so he makes it a priority to tell her this before giving her up.

Sorry for the rant but I get passionate. :)

Secondly, I would absolutely have to disagree with you Amanda about Leon "at least considering her in a romantic light." I think the reason he says that line about "not being a good lover" says less about how he feels about her in "that sense" and more about their levels of equality--esp. where maturity's concerned. After all they've been through together he is finally starting to really understand her, he knows her maturity level is far above his own (since it's obvious he's quite slow and childlike) and, above all, that this is what will finally quell her demands for a more romantic relationship.

Again, I apologize but I'm actually in the midst of writing an essay about this movie right now so I'm kind of in the zone, lol. Sorry! :)

Rebecca said...

Still reading these comments 6 years later?

I didn't care for the painful ending, especially how tough guy, Tony, ratted Leon out. What a betrayal that NEVER should happen when mixing death and the mafia. Tony, the self-proclaimed bank teller also p*ssed me off, supposedly accumulating all of Leon's paydays. Whatever!

As for the original script outlining a sexual relationship between Leon and Mathilda, and to rebut Amanda's comments regarding the age of 12 being absolutely, across the board, too young to make a mature decision about feelings, I disagree. Generally, yes, the majority of 12 year old girls unafflicted by the ills of society should continue to be as sheltered as they have been, but Mathilda was forced to mature early on and to learn some degree of self reliance, at least to her emotional well being and psychological survival of trauma. I do not see that she was not prepared for a physically intimate relationship with a man, who agreeably at times was like a father figure, but within a multi-faceted relationship anyway. After all, there were many captivating moments when Mathilda and her profound, thought-provoking and almost instructional words to Leon created a mother/child dynamic. I also reflect on how some cultures to this day, consider 12 years of age, being the onset of menstrual development, as the beginning of womanhood. I just regard it as a case by case basis, rather than blanketing an opinion that Mathilda was confused, indecisive or unable to perceive a healthy relationship with Leon. I could very well believe that 6 years into the future, when she was ACTUALLY 18, and even beyond, their relationship would have blossomed into a life-long connection.

But, does anyone know what Jean Reno's initial opinion of the original script's sex scenes was? I'd like to know.

Here is my alternate ending...

Stansfield is walking behind Leon in the corridor, gun drawn. Mathilda is walking behind Stansfield pointing a gun at him, a gun that she took with her in the bundle with the plant. She aims for the back of his head, pulls the trigger, and makes her first professional kill. Leon turns around and sees that she saved his life, like he did for her in the beginning of the story. But, being Mathilda, and disregarding Leon's advice about NOT shooting directly in the face for the purpose of identification, she shoots a second round straight into Stansfield's face. She saved her "love", the greatest man that ever lived, AND she got her revenge. Leon decides to get his money (as much as he can) from Tony, then he and Mathilda split and leave town for good to start a new life...who knows where...where a sequel wouldn't be possible or even make sense, because their lives would normalize and become ordinary and mundane.

This is the ending that I can live with. So, from now on when I watch the movie, I'll stop at the corridor scene and imagine the rest.

viagra online said...

I loved your blog on The Professional. I just discovered the movie recently and I'm in love with it and have been going nuts trying to find more about it/on it like behind the scenes books and whatnot and have come up short.

Anonymous said...

as an idea ....would an action sequel with Natalie Portman as she is now be possible?

Anonymous said...

It was a brilliant movie and I loved your analysis. Another thing that really added a new dimension was the music. I absolutely loved the soundtrack.

Chana said...

When you posted this, i was ten, so its cool if you don't read this. I just watched the professional for the first time today and wow. it was amazing. i agree with your analysis, although i really appreciate rebecca's fanfic and will also imagine that ending. The plot was a little bit painful to me because of the sexual awkwardness though, they made such a wonderful father daughter/mother son duo that it would have ruined it for me if they had had sex. And regardless of other cultures, for me she's still twelve and emotionally unstable. Am i wrong for wanting her and "leon" to not grow up in an orphanage in plant form?

Anonymous said...

Wow... Long been one of my very favorite special finds I share with friends along side "The Big Hit" and albeit an entirely different genre; "A Night's Tale" and pretty much for the same reasons you nailed her in your bog... they are all three character driven... and almost un-acted but rather lived in their characters... YOU captured everything I thought! Other favorite scene and acting job Gary Oldman's performance riveting as well! "GET ME EVERYONE!

Anonymous said...

Great analyzation of this wonderful film! You really hit the nail on the head with this one.

After watching this film yesterday, I've literally fallen in love with every aspect of the movie.

God I wish it wasn't so hard to let this movie go and return back to my boring, normal life.

Anonymous said...

This was such a beautiful movie!!

MATT said...

Best movie ever! Okay if people are still reading this let me know. Im going to send Luc Besson a letter pretty much pleading for him to make a Leon sequel.I hope we can all send him a letter and convince him to do a Leon sequel. here's his address

Luc Besson

CBC

11 Rue de la Croix Boissee

Mennecy 91540

France

i didnt send my letter yet, i will do so soon.And if anyone has any other ideas of how we can try and get the ball rolling let me and everyone who wants a sequel what to do. my email is dr.shitsngiggles@yahoo.com

John said...

http://www.fanfiction.net/s/5846143/1/Professional_Lovers

john said...

http://www.fanfiction.net/s/1791741/13/The_Protege

Matt said...

Best movie ever! Okay if people are still reading this let me know. Im going to send Luc Besson a letter pretty much pleading for him to make a Leon sequel.I hope we can all send him a letter and convince him to do a Leon sequel. here's his address

Luc Besson

CBC

11 Rue de la Croix Boissee

Mennecy 91540

France

i didnt send my letter yet, i will do so soon.And if anyone has any other ideas of how we can try and get the ball rolling let me and everyone who wants a sequel what to do. my email is dr.shitsngiggles@yahoo.com

Tom said...

hey are people still reading these comments? this is my favorite film and would just like to chat about it,Also who wants a sequel?

Matt said...

Best movie ever! Okay if people are still reading this let me know. Im going to send Luc Besson a letter pretty much pleading for him to make a Leon sequel.I hope we can all send him a letter and convince him to do a Leon sequel. here's his address

Luc Besson

CBC

11 Rue de la Croix Boissee

Mennecy 91540

France

i didnt send my letter yet, i will do so soon.And if anyone has any other ideas of how we can try and get the ball rolling let me and everyone who wants a sequel what to do. my email is dr.shitsngiggles@yahoo.com

Matt said...

León The Professional : A sequel and why and why not it should happen

Why not: León The Professional is a perfect classic that doesn’t need a sequel. Mathilda gave León roots at the end of the film and León wants her to live the rest of her life as happy as she can. Mathilda is told by León that once you’ve killed someone your never the same again. So why would Mathilda disobey León?


Why: we can’t help imagining Mathilda pretending to be happy and putting on a fake smile from time to time because she lost León. And going to the plant she planted to talk to León for advice about everything, correcting people when they’ve said something bad about pigs. And maybe she’s living in an apartment with pig nik naks and plants and still has her stuffed bunny and León’s piggy, maybe going to the theatre because she is now a Gene Kelly fan/buff. And what if she decided to see how good León trained her? What if she found out that Tony gave León to Stansfield? Would she get revenge and finally be as happy as she can be without León?… What if?


Verdict: Sequel
A sequel would only work if Luc Besson Himself wrote and directed it. I agree with him 100% that he has to do it. We want you Luc to take your time and write and direct a damn good sequel, but Natalie Portman and Danny Aiello aren’t getting any younger.

Anonymous said...

To all the people wanting a sequel,

The film 'Columbiana' which was produced by Luc Besson was written as a sequel to this film. Although it's a different story with different characters, the main women in the film is supposed to be Mathilda when she's older.

Anonymous said...

I used to like the film alot. I think it appears, though, to a very immature part of the male psyche. Besson was basically having sex with a 14 year old when he wrote this (she would have his baby at 16 years old), and the whole film, which he wrote during this period, reeks if male, exploitation fantasy. Portman even wears a fetish dog collar throughout most of it.

aw said...

Nice analysis...but I could have done without the "stereotypical black female moviegoer" stuff. Essentially it would seem you are referring to "annoying moviegoers" and ought to use that phrase...IMO...still good analysis and synopsis of the movie thanks~aw

bills smith said...

Download The Professional Movie

cherrycharchar said...

thanks so much for your analysis! I can't believe I am commenting on a post written about 9 years ago and there are still people reading and commenting on it!
I am totally immersed in the movie and it has saddened so much that Leon is shot at the end, despite the dim light he can see at the building door.

Anonymous said...

my name is brad stevens and i just watched this movie tonight. I found it to be very powerful emotionally because of the connection between the two characters and i was sad when leon died. they should've made an alternative ending where he lived that is what i would've rather seen although he did go out like a G and killed the guy who slaughtered mathilda's family

dwinta ristasya said...

i was just 1 month old when this movie came out. i'm watching leon today for the first time, such a beautiful and tear jerker movie..... unforgetable cinematic experience :')

Chris Wright said...

I just saw Leon for the first time this week, and I was blown away. What a unique film. Really enjoyed this analysis, it's all spot-on.

Anonymous said...

Just watched it again tonight. It's maybe the 20th time I've watched it since it came out and it's just as good now as it was when it was new. Patrick, I agree on your assessment of it being character driven over action. Most films of this type are the opposite. Great characters and the acting is superb.

Anonymous said...

I think that the love between leon and mathilda is a father-daughter kind of love. The scene she says they are lovers its just to fuck on her classmate she hates and she checked in on the hotel. Thats why she before says "if things get hot she'll take the heat". She is getting that girl in a big problem. My opinion

Anna / Artgoddessmama said...

I'm watching this movievright now! �� GreT movie!

Anonymous said...

Love the comments.
However did Danny rat on Leon?
If you look at him (Danny) at end of movie, he shows sign that duress had been applied to reveal Leon's presence.
Whose idea that Mathilda could go to an orphanage?
How long would you expect her to last?
She'd be reaching for her guns at the first rebuke from a teacher.

Thanks a zillion...Lyndon

Anonymous said...

Carrying on the tradition 2015 ahhh yes time has passed I loved this movie because it led me to Nina Simone. I do like the alternative ending someone wrote. I remember thinking she is a fast one but she knows no other way. Giving of her body using sex she thinks that is what she has to do.She does not see age because she was treated like she was another adult living in the house. She never had a chance to be a child. I felt Leon knew he was about to die.He knew Stansfield was behind him I felt he smirked because he had something waiting for Stansfield. I just felt being a killer your vibes will tell you this" ain't gonna end well" He was already shot in the shoulder and I think he knew it was fatal he just wanted to last long enough to let Stansfield think he was victorious That was my take on the smirk at the end To me he had to die to keep the raw realness of the movie. He was her mentor that put her in a safe place. He taught her how to love and she taught him the same..How to love.I broke down as soon as I heard Sting singing I love the movie it just felt so real that is why I continue watching it See you all in 2016

Anonymous said...

I saw this movie in 1994, but forgot about it until I saw it mentioned while on Google recently.
Since then, I am frequently watching it and analysing comments.
I am mystified by the Danny Guy. He allots jobs to Tony but "minds" Tony's money.
We are left to surmise that Tony is "none too bright".
However, to be the consummate "hit-man", he would have to be able to read and write e.g. look at all those complicated weapons.
Also what about shopping, paying the rent, taxi-fares.
This area of Tony's life was not fully explained.
Enjoy this page and will constantly refer to it for upgrades.
I would like opinions on this "Danny" guy?
Thanks a million
Lyndon ... Thursday 16th July 2015.

Anonymous said...

i's been 2 weeks since the first time I watched this movie! Since then, it follows me everywhere, even in my sleep! I fall in love with it! And my heart's aching with the ending!

Anonymous said...

10 years!!! woohooo!!!!!!

Claudia Morales said...

Just saw this film, very awesome... I'm wanting to see the alternate ending version now!

Anonymous said...

I'm from Hong Kong. I love this movie so much. I just wonder about does anyone try to write/already write a happy ending of this movie at their's leisure. It can satiate our imagination about the happy life bwtween Leon and Mathilda, and to see how their relationship grow up afterwards.

On the other hand, I knew this movie after watching the "Out Of The Dark" in which the main character is Stephen Chow, who is a famous comedian in Hong Kong. The movie is in a horror and black humor style. The main characters had imitated the costume and characteristics of Leon and Mathilda. I don't know how much foreigners recognize Stephen Chow. Here is the link about this movie, in which you can see the similar costume wore by Leon immediately.

https://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%9B%9E%E9%AD%82%E5%A4%9C_(1995%E5%B9%B4%E9%9B%BB%E5%BD%B1)

Chris Wright said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Chris Wright said...

I'm from Vancouver and Stephen Chow is well-known to my friends and I from films like Shaolin Soccer, The God of Cooking, and Kung Fu Hustle. There aren't many Chinese actors with a presence in the western imagination, but he's certainly one of them.

Anonymous said...

I just saw this for the first time and WOW what a movie.. just wanted to comment so you know this is still being read in 2016!

I think leon and mathildas relationship/feelings toward one another are more complicated and less black and white than most people think. Mathilda clearly grew up way too fast and is not as ignorant/uninterested in sex as most 12 year olds. On top of that she's not used to anyone genuinely caring about her or being protective of her. Then here comes leon, someone who cares about her, provides for her, trusts her, and treats her as an equal. I think it makes sense that she would develop a crush on him that she wouldn't know how to explain except by love. Plus it doesn't hurt that he's a very handsome, mysterious, powerful guy.

And then there's leon who's been a complete loner ever since the incident with his past love. The only people around him are the ones that he's supposed to kill and the guy he works for who takes advantage of his money. Then he takes in mathilda which is the only good thing that's happened to him in who knows how long. I think what began as a father daughter relationship probably began to evolve as they became close and she confessed her love for him. I think he's in conflict with himself because he knows it's wrong, hence how he never knows how to act when she was dressing up or asks to kiss him/sleep with him. He never says he doesn't want to or isn't interested, just that he wouldn't make a good lover or "sit down there are people watching." I think he has his mind made up to not act on anything and he may not even completely understand what he feels toward her.

I am very glad they chose not to include the sex scene in the original script. That just seems wrong and out of place.

Chris Wright said...

Great post! You're a girl right?

Anonymous said...

This is AMAZING! I have been crying for days after seeing this movie!!!! I even was talking to the spirit of Leon's actor to tell him what a great movie it was, until I looked it up and found out he is from Morocco, he is Spanish, not French AAAAAND he is still alive! The movie--it won't let go of some part of me--and I can see IM NOT ALONE. There is SO MUCH you could say and so much of what everybody said is really really good--just wanted to say a couple things.
Girls, like Matilda sure they wear dog collars and try to be sexy. How else are they going to eat? And we all have to eat.
And maybe Luc Besson is trying to tell the story like he wishes it would have been--not in reality the way it was. IE he was the girl's hero--they saved each other, and they lived happily forever in a garden outside a prep school someplace and never had to kill nobody again anymore.
Amen.

Anonymous said...

First comment from 2017, howdy :). Just saw this movie for the first time and I reaaaallllyyyy enjoyed it! A bit of a sad ending though, but hey, it wouldn't be sad unless the rest of the movie put it into contrast, would it? 11/10.

Old Tree said...

Hi, just want to let you know I'm reading every comment and happy to found your blog. 2017!

nagehan said...

if i were matilda i would love leon too.Ughh I want someone like him.and too bad he died im really sorry about that..i wish they could be together forever